2018 Hugo Fancast

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Posted on : 6/12/2018 04:43:00 PM | By : Dann | In : , ,

My review of this year's fan-casting nominees.  I began listening before the packets were issued.  I selected roughly two hours worth of material based on the episode descriptions.  If the descriptions sounded like a topic (or topics) that might interest me, then they got added to my list.

By selecting episodes that attract my interest, I'm hoping to give each nominee the best chance to engage me.

As that is the process that I began using, I think it would be unfair to change my approach and use whatever is in the packets to guide my listening.

As with my indispensable podcast listing, my ratings are based on three factors; production values, entertainment, and information.*

  • Doctor Who: Verity! (Episodes 143 and Aug 2, 2017) - The hosts seemed to be having a great time discussing their perspectives.  They shared the microphone well and were entertaining.  If I were inclined towards Doctor Who, I would be very inclined to make this a regular part of my podcasting habit.  One modest word of warning.  The rampant objectification and sexism displayed in the August 2nd episode served as a pointed reminder of the importance of including a diverse range of opinions.  
  • The Sword and Laser (Episodes 277, 282, 284, and 310) - This show was quite delightful.  The hosts are engaging with one another and with the audience.  They covered a lot of ground with respect to new books being published and discussions on Goodreads.  If I weren't already fully engaged in the genre, I would consider these folks to be a good starting point.  My only criticism is that most of the "information" in the information part of my assessment ended up being an invitation to join them on Goodreads.  It sounds like a lively group.  If I had the time, I would definitely consider engaging with them.
  • Galactic Suburbia - (Episodes 163 and 168) - This is a podcast that I put below No Award last year because of their fixation on identity politics.  That factor was dialed back quite a bit in these two episodes.  The hosts were lively, shared the microphone quite well, and covered a broad range of properties and topics within the genre.
  • The Coode Street Podcast - (Episodes 315 with Liz Bourke and Niall Harrison, and 317 with Irene Gallow) - Episode 315 suffered from a dry erudition that one might imagine occurring in a stately library furnished with overstuffed chairs with the vague aroma of pipe tobacco floating in the air.  The thoughts of the hosts and the guests were mildly entertaining and reasonably informative.  Beyond that, there isn't much to recall.  Episode 317 was much better as the hosts asked interesting questions and then got out of Irene Gallo's way.  Her responses to their questions about her career and her role in the industry were quite interesting.  [Before someone asks, yes, I know about Irene Gallo's past pronouncements.  There are some areas where she and I clearly do not agree.  Those issues were not addressed this episode and I am unwilling to discount the Coode Street Podcast due to her disagreeable past.]
  • No Award
  • Ditch Diggers - (Episodes 42 and 50) - This was a tough one.  One of the hosts grinds on my ears a bit.  He is a bit on the pompous side.  However, Episode 42 provided some fantastic role-playing to illustrate how writers (and other creatives) and reject offers of working for "exposure".  The flip side was Episode 50 which used precisely the same situation to provide a "fuck you" to authors that choose to work for exposure.  Intolerance and uncompassionate perspectives are unworthy of awards.
  • Fangirl Happy Hour - (Episodes 81, 85, 101, and 102) - The primary problem with this podcast is that the range of discussion was somewhat limited.  Quite a bit of discussion ended up being "I liked that thing" followed by "I liked that thing, too.  I also liked this other thing" followed by "I liked that thing, too!"  That is a bit of an oversimplification, but not by much.  There wasn't much of a discussion about why the "thing" was liked.  A secondary issue was that the hosts seem to be only able to perceive the world from an identity politics/intersectional perspective.  The most prominent example was a discussion of the movie Stargate.  There was a brief discussion lamenting that the plot involved "white people saving brown people".  The hosts overlooked the fact that the team sent through the Stargate was diverse.  They also overlooked the fact that the people being saved in this particular case were being held as slaves and therefore could not save themselves.  There was also an offhand comment along the lines of "White people are creepy".  That sort of enabling of racism really needs to be rejected.
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*Entertainment - Are the hosts engaging with one another and their audience.  Do they leave you wanting to listen more.

Information - Are the hosts presenting new information.  Are they at least providing a fresh perspective on an old property.

Production values - Do they share the microphone well.  Is there distracting background noise.  Are the levels on the microphones equalized so all of the personalities are speaking at the same relative volume.

There are some factors that might influence two different categories such as a host that is less than engaging as a speaker.


2018 Hugo Graphic Novel

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Posted on : 6/11/2018 04:17:00 PM | By : Dann | In : , ,


Updated as I complete and rank each entry in this year's Graphic Novel competition for the Hugo Awards.

  • Monstress - Volume 2 - Yet another great entry from this team.  The artwork is awesome and the story is fantastic.  Most importantly, they didn't let the sub-text step in front of the text.
  • Black Bolt - Volume 1 Hard Times - Wonderful artwork, compelling narratives, and engaging characters.  This was very hard to put down.  What separated Black Bolt from Paper Girls was that the story didn't need an explanation that only existed in other works and the art was just a touch grander.
  • Paper Girls - Volume 3 - Although this is the third volume, the team does a good job of getting the reader up to speed.  The characters, as always, are very engaging.  The plotlines keep the reader interested.  The artwork is good, but not quite as good as Monstress or Black Bolt.  Glad to see this series back as a contender.
  • No Award
  • Saga Volume 7 - Yet again, the authors seem intent on letting the subtext of their story bleed over the genre-related presentation.  It ended up seeming to me that they had a perspective to present and slathered on a layer of science-fantasium over the top of their narrative.
  • Bitch Planet - Volume 2 - A classic example of letting the sub-text get in front of the text.  Uninspiring artwork.  And quite frankly the sci-fi elements seem like they are splashed on as an afterthought.  I didn't bother finishing it.
  • My Favorite Thing is Monsters 1 - Artwork that borders on awesome and "meh" in turns.  I got a quarter way through it and couldn't really discern much of a plot.  The artwork, in particular, reminded me of some of Frank Cho's fine-line art efforts.  If all of the artwork had been at that level, then I might have invested more time in the book.